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Wednesday April 24, 2019
Start: 24.04.2019 15:00

CAB G 51

 Moritz Hoffmann - PhD Defense: Managing and understanding distributed stream processing

Thursday April 25, 2019
Start: 25.04.2019 10:00

Thursday, 25. April 2019, 10:00-11:00 in CAB E 72

Speaker: Peter Pietzuch (Imperial College London)

Title: Scaling Deep Learning on Multi-GPU Servers

  

 

 

Abstract

With the widespread availability of GPU servers, scalability in terms of the number of GPUs when training deep learning models becomes a paramount concern. For many deep learning models, there is a scalability challenge: to keep multiple GPUs fully utilised, the batch size must be sufficiently large, but a large batch size slows down model convergence due to the less frequent model updates.

In this talk, I describe CrossBow, a new single-server multi-GPU deep learning system that avoids the above trade-off. CrossBow trains multiple model replicas concurrently on each GPU, thereby avoiding under-utilisation of GPUs even when the preferred batch size is small. For this, CrossBow (i) decides on an appropriate number of model replicas per GPU and (ii) employs an efficient and scalable synchronisation scheme within and across GPUs.

Short Bio:

Peter Pietzuch is a Professor at Imperial College London, where he leads the Large-scale Data & Systems (LSDS) group (http://lsds.doc.ic.ac.uk) in the Department of Computing. His research focuses on the design and engineering of scalable, reliable and secure large-scale software systems, with a particular interest in performance, data management and security issues. He has published papers in premier international venues, including SIGMOD, VLDB, OSDI, USENIX ATC, EuroSys, SoCC, ICDCS, CCS, CoNEXT, NSDI, and Middleware. Before joining Imperial College London, he was a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University. He holds PhD and MA degrees from the University of Cambridge.

Friday May 17, 2019
Start: 17.05.2019 12:00

Friday, 17. May 2019, 12:00-13:00 in CAB E 72

Speaker: Tim Kraska (MIT)

Title: Towards Learned Algorithms, Data Structures, and Systems

 

  

Abstract

All systems and applications are composed from basic data structures and algorithms, such as index structures, priority queues, and sorting algorithms. Most of these primitives have been around since the early beginnings of computer science (CS) and form the basis of every CS intro lecture. Yet, we might soon face an inflection point: recent results show that machine learning has the potential to alter the way those primitives or systems at large are implemented in order to provide optimal performance for specific applications. In this talk, I will provide an overview on how machine learning is changing the way we build systems and outline different ways to build learned algorithms and data structures to achieve “instance-optimality” with a particular focus on data management systems.

Short Bio:

Tim Kraska is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and co-director of the Data System and AI Lab at MIT (DSAIL@CSAIL). Currently, his research focuses on building systems for machine learning, and using machine learning for systems. Before joining MIT, Tim was an Assistant Professor at Brown, spent time at Google Brain, and was a PostDoc in the AMPLab at UC Berkeley after he got his PhD from ETH Zurich. Tim is a 2017 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in computer science and received several awards including the 2018 VLDB Early Career Research Contribution Award, the 2017 VMware Systems Research Award


 COMPASS TALKS

Monday May 20, 2019
Start: 20.05.2019 17:00

HG D22

 David Sidler - PhD Defense: In-Network Data Processing using FPGAs

Friday May 24, 2019