COMPASS TALK by Ben Zhao (University of Chicago): Hidden Backdoors in Deep Learning Systems

26.09.2019 10:00
Europe/Zurich

Thursday, 26. September 2019, 10:00-11:00 in CAB E 72

Speaker: Ben Zhao (University of Chicago).

Title: Hidden Backdoors in Deep Learning Systems

 

 

 

 

Abstract:

Lack of transparency in today’s deep learning systems has paved the way for a new type of threats, commonly referred to as backdoor or Trojan attacks. In a backdoor attack, a malicious party can corrupt a deep learning model (either at initial training time or later) to embed hidden classification rules that do not interfere with normal classification, unless an unusual “trigger” is applied to the input, which would then produce unusual (and likely incorrect) results. For example, a facial recognition model with a backdoor might recognize anyone with a pink earring as Elon Musk. Backdoor attacks have been validated in a number of image classification applications, and are difficult to detect given the black-box nature of most DNN models.

In this talk, I will describe two recent results on detecting and understanding backdoor attacks on deep learning systems. I will first present Neural Cleanse (S&P 2019), the first robust tool to detect a wide range of backdoors in deep learning models. We use the idea of inter-label perturbation distances to detect when a backdoor trigger has created shortcuts to misclassification to a particular label. Second, I will describe our new work on Latent Backdoors (CCS 2019), a stronger type of backdoor attacks that are more difficult to detect, and survives retraining in commonly used transfer learning systems. We use experimental validation to show that latent backdoors can be quite robust and stealthy, even against the latest detection tools (including neural cleanse). There are no known techniques to detect latent backdoors, but we present alternative techniques to defend against them via disruption.

Bio:

Ben Zhao is the Neubauer Professor of Computer Science at University of Chicago. He completed his PhD from Berkeley (2004) and his BS from Yale (1997). He is an ACM distinguished scientist, and recipient of the NSF CAREER award, MIT Technology Review's TR-35 Award (Young Innovators Under 35), ComputerWorld Magazine's Top 40 Tech Innovators award, Google Faculty award, and IEEE ITC Early Career Award. His work has been covered by media outlets such as Scientific American, New York Times, Boston Globe, LA Times, MIT Tech Review, and Slashdot. He has published more than 160 publications in areas of security and privacy, networked systems, wireless networks, data-mining and HCI (H-index > 60). He recently served as PC chair for World Wide Web Conference (WWW 2016) and the Internet Measurement Conference (IMC 2018), and is a general cochair for Hotnets 2020.