Gustavo Alonso gave keynotes at the 5th Workshop on Principles and Practice of Consistency for Distributed Data and at the 8th Workshop on Systems for Multi-core and Heterogeneous Architectures, both at EuroSys 2018

Gustavo Alonso gave the talk "The impact of modern hardware on system design" at the 8th Workshop on Systems for Multi-core and Heterogeneous Architectures (SFMA 2018) and the talk "20+ Years of data replication and consistency. Have we learned anything?" at the 5th Workshop on Principles and Practice of Consistency for Distributed Data (PaPoC 2018), both collocated with EuroSys 2018, in Porto, Portugal.

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"The impact of modern hardware on system design"

Abstract:

Computing Systems are undergoing a multitude of interesting changes: from the platforms (cloud, appliances) to the workloads, data types, and operations (big data, machine learning). Many of these changes are driven or being tackled through innovation in hardware even to the point of having fully specialized designs for particular applications. In this talk I will review some of the most important changes happening in hardware and discuss how they affect system design as well as the opportunities they create. I will focus on data processing as an example but also discuss applications in other areas.

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"20+ Years of data replication and consistency. Have we learned anything?"

Abstract:

Data consistency is a fundamental topic in computer science, cutting across many areas and applications. Surprisingly, a significant part of ongoing research revolves around ideas pursued decades ago. The fact that published papers systematically ignore all this previous work does not mean it does not exist. Maybe the context has changed (cloud, geo-replication, massive scale, etc.) but the principles behind consistency for replicated data remain the same and have been known for a long time. In this talk, I will argue that there is a corpus of basic principles governing data consistency and that the mapping of such principles to mechanisms and system implications is also well established after decades of research. By providing a historical perspective of how data replication, and the subsequent problem of consistency, has evolved over the years, I will enumerate these principles, discuss the performance aspects associated to them, and relate these ideas to existing systems and trends. The goal of the talk is to open up new perspectives in an area where there is still much to be done and that has become highly relevant in the era of large scale computing infrastructures.