Courses

AOS - Fall 2017 - Book

We host the draft PDF of the AOS course book on this page. We will update the linked PDF throughout the course when additional chapters are ready, so check this page regularly if you choose to download and/or print the book.

News

  • 2017-09-21: Uploaded book draft with chapters 1 - 4.

Download

The AOS book [pdf]

 

 

Temporary Download for the week1 (milestone0) handout:

[tar.gz]

Unpack as follows:

$ mkdir bf_aos
$ cd bf_aos
$ tar xf /path/to/downloaded/aos2017_week1.tar.gz

Communication Networks Seminar

Overview

We will study recent advances in networking by reading and presenting research papers from top conferences in the area. Each session will include 2 research papers on a topic, at least one of which will be presented by a student. Both papers will be discussed in each session. Prior to each session, every student is expected to submit brief reviews for the session's papers here.

 

Objectives

  • To understand the state-of-the-art in the field
  • To learn to read, present and critique papers
  • To identify opportunities for new research

 

Expectations

  • Attend and actively participate in the entire seminar.
  • Present one of the seminar topics.
  • Submit brief reviews for each Tuesday's readings on the previous Friday.
  • You will be evaluated on all three factors above.

 

Resources

S. Keshav, How to Read a Paper.

 

Seminar Hours

Tuesday, 15:00-17:00 in CAB F 72. [Please note the change of venue.]

 

Staff

 

Schedule

 Date  Lecture  Presenters
 20.09  Introduction and overview  Timothy Roscoe
 Ankit Singla
 27.09  Data center network topology design (p1, p2)  Simon Kassing
 04.10  Data center network monitoring (p3, p4)  François Wirz
 11.10  Flow / packet scheduling - I (p5, p6)  Darko Makreshanski
 18.10  Flow / packet scheduling - II (p7, p8)  Reto Achermann
 25.10  Programmable packet processing (p9, p10)  Vojislav Dukic
 01.11   --- No seminar ---  
 08.11   --- No seminar ---  
 15.11  Network verification (p11, p12)  Zsolt István
 22.11  Congestion control (p13, p14)  Daniele Asoni
 29.11  Internet architecture - I (p15, p16)

 Antonios Karkatsoulis (p15)

 Simon Peyer (p16)

 06.12  Internet architecture - II (p17, p18)

 Melanie Hüsser (p17)

 Stefan Milosavljevic (p18)

 13.12  Industry experience (p19, p20)  Jonas Fernbach

 

 

Reading list

 

Case Studies from Practice

Exam review: 

  • Thursday 28. July 2016:  9:30-11:30 (CAB F 78)
  • Wednesday 3. August 2016: 14:00-16:00 (CAB F 78)

Exam: 

  • Final exam: 08 June 2016 at 10:00 in HG F 3.
  • Mid-term 21 March in HG G5 (45 minutes)

Course description

The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of “real-life” challenges taken from corporate settings and teach them how to address these.

Course Program and Materials 

Objective

By using case studies that are based on actual IT projects, students will learn how to deal with complex, not-straightforward problems. It will help them to apply their theoretical Computer Science background to real life situations and will teach them fundamental principles of IT management and challenges with IT in practice.
 

Content

The course "Case Studies from Practice" bridges the gap between computer science at ETH and the industry. In interactive case studies company representatives present the diversity of challenges in the daily routine and work of computer science graduates from ETH. As an integral part of the course, non-technical skills such as business problem-solving, communication and presentation, interviewing and relationship management are discussed and trained.

The course is particularly suitable for students who want to gain an overview of the different working areas and want to prepare for entrance into professional life.

Presenting companies so far include Deloitte (how to develop innovative technology solutions for a luxury retailer), Selfnation (lessons learned from a startup company), Credit Suisse (investment banking case), HP (business continuity management), 28msec (product pricing in a software startup company), Open Web Technology (developing a customer-centric digital strategy), Teralytics (Big Data in Practice), and Marc Brandis Strategic Consulting (various). Others will be confirmed as soon as possible.

 

Course Hours

Lectures

  • Mon, 12:00-14:00 ML F 36

Exercise

  • Mon,  14:00-15:00 ML F 36


Lecturer

Marc Brandis

Advanced Computer Networks Spring 2016

News

  • EXAM REVIEW: 
    • 16.09.2016 10:00-12:00 (CAB F 78)
    • 21.09.2016 14:00-16:00 (CAB F 78)
  • Exam: Friday 26.08.2016, 9-11am
  • Second project assignment online (Assignment 8).
  • First project assignment online (Assignment 7).
  • No class or exercise session next week (March 28 - April 1)
  • Slides for lecture 5 available
  • Solution for assignment 3 is available.
  • Assignment 4 is up
  • Slides for fourth lecture are up
  • Solutions for assignment 1 and 2 are available (login with your nethz account)
  • Assignment 3 is up
  • Slides for third lecture are up
  • Slides for second lecture are up
  • Slides for first lecture are up

 

Overview

This course covers a set of advanced topics in computer networks. The focus is on principles, architectures, and protocols used in modern data center networks. 

The goal of the course is to build on basic networking course material in providing an understanding of large, complex networked systems, and provide concrete experience of the challenges through a series of lab exercises.

Topics of this course include:

  • Networking Principles (naming, end-to-end protocol design, network state management, etc.)
  • Data center architectures (topology, addressing, etc.)
  • Data center network protocols (DCTCP, Infiniband, CEE, etc.)
  • End host architectures (U-Net, RDMA, Netmap, etc.)
  • Server and network virtualization
  • Software defined networking
  • Applications and application traffic

Assessment

The course consists of lectures, exercises, and a written examination. The end of semester exam will be 2 hours, with no supporting material allowed. The final assessment will be a combination of exercises and examination grades. The exam will account for 80% of the final grade, and the two programming assignments for 20%.

Staff

Course Hours

  • Lectures: Tue 13-15h, CAB G 51
  • Exercises: Thu 14-16h, CAB G 52

Additional material

Schedule

Lecture Date Topic Materials
L1  23.02  Network design principles I   Slides
L2  01.03  Network design principles II  Slides
L3  08.03   Data centre traffic patterns  Slides
L4  15.03   Data centre topologies I  Slides
L5  22.03   Data centre topologies II Slides
L6  05.04  Server Virtualization Slides
L7  12.04 Software Defined Networking Slides VN
Slides SDN 
L8 19.04  Data Center TCP Slides 
L9  26.04  Lossless Protocols Slides
L10  03.05  Endpoint Optimizations Slides 
L11  10.05 Network Function Virtualization  Slides 
L13  17.05 Load balancing   Slides
L14  24.05 Application empowerment   Slides
L15  31.05     

 

Assignments

Week no. Assign. Date Topic Materials
1 A1 25.02 Network Principles A1-pdf A1-slides A1-solution
2 A2 03.03 Fundamentals and principles A2-pdf A2-slides A2-solution
3 A3 10.03 Data Center Applications & Traffic A3-pdf A3-slides A3-solution
4 A4 17.03  Data Center Topologies A4-pdf A4-slides A4-solution
5  A5  24.03 Addressing & Routing  A5-pdf A5-slides A5-solution
6  A6 07.04  Server Virtualization A6-pdf A6-slides A6-solution
7  P1 14.04 Software Defined Networking A7-pdf A7-slides
 9  P1 21.04   A7W2-slides
10 P1 28.04   --
 11  - 05.05 no exercise (Ascension, public holiday)  --
 12  P1/P2 12.05  RDMA programming A8-pdf A8-handout A8-VM (from ETH network only)
 13  P2 19.05    
14  P2  26.05    
15  P2 02.06    
         

 

Reading list

Lecture 1

  • You Don't Know Jack about Network Performance. Kevin Fall, Steve McCanne. ACM Queue. [link]
  • Improving performance on the internet. Tom Leighton. ACM Communications. [link]
  • On the Naming and Binding of Network Destinations. Jerome Saltzer. [link]

Lecture 2 

  • The Design Philosopy of the DARPA Internet Protocol. David Clark. [link]
  • End-to-End Arguments in System Design. Jerome Saltzer, David Reed, David Clark. [link]
  • A Model, Analysis and Protocol Framework for Soft-State based Communication. Suchitra Raman, Steven McCanne. [link]
  • Transmission Control Protocol Specification. Jon Postel. [link]
  • Cross-Layer Visibility as a Service. R.R. Kompella, A. Greenberg, J. Rexford, A.C Snoeren, J. Yates. [link]

Lecture 3

  • Inside the Social Network’s (Datacenter) Network. A. Roy, et al. [link]
  • Sections 1 and 2 of: Jupiter Rising: A Decade of Clos Topologies and Centralized Control in Google’s Datacenter Network. A. Singh, et al. [link]
  • Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 of: The Nature of Datacenter Traffic: Measurements & Analysis. S. Kandula, et al. [link]

 Lecture 4

  • A Scalable, Commodity Data Center Network Architecture. M. Al-Fares, A. Loukissas, A. Vahdat [link]
  • Jellyfish: Networking Data Centers Randomly. A. Singla, C. Hong, L. Popa, P. B. Godfrey. [link]
  • Optional: Augmenting Data Center Networks with Multi-Gigabit Wireless Links. D. Halperin, et al. [link]
  • Optional: Slim Fly: A Cost Effective Low-Diameter Network Topology. M. Besta, T. Hoefler. [link]

Lecture 5

  • VL2: A Scalable and Flexible Data Center Network. A. Greenberg, et al. [link]
  • CONGA: Distributed Congestion-Aware Load Balancing for Datacenters. M. Alizadeh, et al. [link]
  • Use of BGP for routing in large-scale data centers. P. Lapukhov, et al. [link]
  • Optional: B4: Experience with a Globally-Deployed Software Defined WAN. S. Jain, et al. [link]
  • Optional: PortLand: A Scalable Fault-Tolerant Layer 2 Data Center Network Fabric. R. Niranjan Mysore, et al. [link]
  • Optional: Achieving High Utilization with Software-Driven WAN. C. Hong, et al. [link]

Lecture 6

  • I/O Virtualization. ACM Queue. [link]
  • kvm: the linux virtual machine monitor. [link]
  • virti-io: towards a de-facto standard for virtual I/O devices. [link]

Lecture 7

  • Open vSwitch [link]
  • Implementation Challenges for Software-Defined Networks [link]
  •  

Lecture 8

  • Safe and effective fine-grained TCP retransmissions for datacenter communication. [link]
  • Better never than late: meeting deadlines in datacenter networks. [link]
  • Deadline-aware datacenter TCP. [link]
  • Data Center TCP (DCTCP). [link]
  • Improving Data Center Performance and Robustness with Multipath TCP. [link]
  • Design, Implementation and Evaluation of Multipath TCP. [link]

Lecture 10

  • U-Net: a user-level network interface for parallel and distributed computing [link]
  • TCP offload is a dumb idea whose time has come [link]

Lecture 11

  • Research Directions in Network Service Chaining [link]
  • Languages for Software-Defined Network [link]
  • FlowVisor: A Network Virtualization Layer [link]

Lecture 12

 Lecture 13

  • Fastpass: A Centralized “Zero-Queue” Datacenter Network [link]
  • Enabling End-host Network Functions [link]



 

Advanced Computer Networks Spring 2016

What's new?

  •  

Overview

This course covers a set of advanced topics in computer networks. The focus is on principles, architectures, and protocols used in modern data center networks. 

The goal of the course is to build on basic networking course material in providing an understanding of large, complex networked systems, and provide concrete experience of the challenges through a series of lab exercises.

Topics of this course include:

  • Networking Principles (naming, end-to-end protocol design, network state management, etc.)
  • Data center architectures (topology, addressing, etc.)
  • Data center network protocols (DCTCP, Infiniband, CEE, etc.)
  • End host architectures (U-Net, RDMA, Netmap, etc.)
  • Virtual machine networking
  • Software defined networking

Assessment

The course consists of lectures, exercises, and a written examination. The end of semester exam will be 2 hours, with no supporting material allowed. The final assessment will be a combination of exercises and examination grades. The exam will account for 70% of the final grade, the classroom work for 30%.  It will include two programming assignments and 8 paper exercises given out during the semester.  

 

Staff

Course Hours

  • Lectures: Tue 13-15h, CAB G 51
  • Exercises: Thu 14-16h, CAB G 52

Additional material

 

Schedule

Week no. Lecture Date Topic Materials
         
         

 

Assignments

Week no. Assign. Date Topic Materials
1 A1 19 Feb Network design principles A1-pdf, Slides
2 A2 26 Feb Fundamentals and principles A2-pdf, Slides
3 A3 5 Mar Datacenter topologies  A3-pdf, Slides
4 A4 12 Mar 3-Tier Datacenter Design A4-pdf, Slides
5  A5  19 Mar New Datacenter Architecture A5-pdf, Slides
6  A6 26 Mar Data Center TCP A6-pdf, Slides
7  A7 2 Apr Flow control and DCTCP  A7-pdf, Slides
 9 P1 16 Apr Intro to RDMA programming p1-pdf, Handout, VM (from ETH network only)
10  - 23 Apr -No session-  --
 11  P1 30 Apr RDMA programming Q/A session  
 12 P2 7 May P1 demo, OpenFlow project p2-pdf
 13   14 May --  
14  Jeffrey C. Mogul  21 May  Guest  Lecture  
15   27 May P2 demo  
         

 

Reading list

Lecture 1

  • You Don't Know Jack about Network Performance. Kevin Fall, Steve McCanne. ACM Queue. [link]
  • Improving performance on the internet. Tom Leighton. ACM Communications. [link]
  • On the Naming and Binding of Network Destinations. Jerome Saltzer. [link]

Lecture 2 

  • The Design Philosopy of the DARPA Internet Protocol. David Clark. [link]
  • End-to-End Arguments in System Design. Jerome Saltzer, David Reed, David Clark. [link]
  • A Model, Analysis and Protocol Framework for Soft-State based Communication. Suchitra Raman, Steven McCanne. [link]
  • Transmission Control Protocol Specification. Jon Postel. [link]
  • Cross-Layer Visibility as a Service. R.R. Kompella, A. Greenberg, J. Rexford, A.C Snoeren, J. Yates. [link]
  • A Blueprint for Introducing Disruptive Technology into the Internet. Larry Peterson, Tom Anderson, David Culler and Timothy Roscoe. [link]
  • Overcoming the Internet Impasse through Virtualization. Tom Anderson, Larry Peterson, Scott Shenker, Jonathan Turner. [link]
  • Resilient Overlay Networks. David Anderson, Hari Balakrishnan, Frans Kaashoek, Robert Morris. [link]

Lecture 3

  • Parallel Computer Architecture: A Hardware/Software Approach. David E. Culler and Jaswinder Pal Singh  [link]

Lecture 4

  • The cost of a cloud: research problems in data center networks [link]
  • G.A.A. Santana, "Data Center Virtualization Fundamentals ," Cisco Press, 2013 , ISBN:1587143240

Lecture 5

  • Portland : A Scalable Fault - Tolerant Layer 2 Data Center Network Fabric [link]
  • VL2: Scalable and Flexible Data Center Network [link]
  • Facebook datacenter fabric [link]
  •  The Datacenter as a Computer: an introduction to the Design of Warehouse - Scale Machines, Second Edition. [link]

Lecture 6

  • The nature of data center traffic and analysis. [link]
  • Network traffic characteristics of data centers in the wild. [link]
  • Safe and effective fine-grained TCP retransmissions for datacenter communication. [link]
  • Better never than late: meeting deadlines in datacenter networks. [link]
  • Deadline-aware datacenter TCP. [link]
  • Data Center TCP (DCTCP). [link]
  • Improving Data Center Performance and Robustness with Multipath TCP. [link]
  • Design, Implementation and Evaluation of Multipath TCP. [link]

 Lecture 8

  • U-Net: a user-level network interface for parallel and distributed computing [link]
  • Arsenic: A user-accessible gigabit ethernet interface [link]
  • TCP offload is a dumb idea whose time has come [link]
  • FaRM: fast remote memory [link]

 Lecture 9 

  • OpenFlow: Enabling Innovation in Campus Networks [link]
  • Can the production network be the testbed [link]
  • OpenFlow Specification  [link

Lecture 11

  • TCP Splicing for Application Layer Proxy Performance [link]
  • Ananta: Cloud Scale Load Balancing [link]

 

Lecture 12

  • Managing Data Transfers in Computer Clusters with Orchestra [link]
  • Fastpass: A Centralized "Zero-Queue" Data Center Network [link]

 

Lecture 13

  • Inferring the Network Latency Requirements of Cloud Tenants [link]
  • Cicada: Introducing Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Networks [link]

 

 



 

 

Courses Spring 2015

SPRING SEMESTER 2015                                                            * Fall Semester 2014

Algorithms for Database Systems (Seminar)

Peter Widmayer, Arijit Khan - 2 credits, 2 S
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry


Advanced Computer Networks

Patrick Stüdi - 5 credits, 2V+2U
Course webpage -
ETH Course catalogue entry


Case Studies from Practice 

Marc Brandis - 4 credits, 2V+3U
Course webpage -
ETH Course catalogue entry


Data Modelling and Databases

Gustavo Alonso - 7 credits, 4V+2U
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry


Software Defined Networking: The Data Centre Perspective

Timothy Roscoe - 2 credits, 2S
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry


 

 

 

 

 

Algorithms for Database Systems (Seminar)

NEW:

Please submit your final report to all three professors by email. If you already sent us the final report but do not see it uploaded at the end of this course webpage within the next 7 days, please send us a follow-up email.

Organization:

Peter Widmayer (ETH), Arijit Khan (ETH), Michael Böhlen (UZH)

EMails: widmayer AT inf.ethz.ch, arijit.khan AT inf.ethz.ch, boehlen AT ifi.uzh.ch 

 

Overview and Objectives:

The theme of the seminar this year is Big Data. The seminar will address various topics in this area: Algorithms, Machine Learning, Data Mining, and Applications.

Students learn how to critically read and study research papers, how to summarize the contents of a paper, and how to present it in a seminar.

 

Teaching Format:

Each participant writes a self-contained report of about 10 pages (single-column is fine) and gives a 30 minute presentation. This year, all presentations will be at the blackboard only. (No computers; no powerpoint!) 

Each participant is associated to another participant who serves as a shepherd (aka buddy) for report and presentation. Buddies read the report, make suggestions for improvements, and help with the presentation (e.g., dry runs). 

The first version of the report is due two weeks before the date of the presentation. (No excuses!) This first version of the report and presentation will be discussed with the buddy and a professor one week before the presentation. The final versions of the report are due at the end of the semester. 

Grading will depend on the quality of the report, talk, active participation during the seminar, and impact as a shepherd.

 

Setup and Organization:

The setup of the seminar will be discussed on on Tuesday, February 17, from 14:15 - 16:00 h in room CAB H 52. In this meeting, the seminar topics will be presented and assigned to participants.  The seminar talks will be given in two blocks on two Saturdays: March 21 and April 25. Participation on both Saturdays is mandatory.

 

Selection of Students/ Papers:

Please select exactly three papers from the list below that you would like to present and list them in descending order of your preferences. Send the list by email to <arijit.khan AT inf.ethz.ch> and with title "Algorithms for Database Systems Seminar - 3 Topics" before Thursday (Feb 19) 12:00 noon. No late emails will be considered. We shall decide the students for this seminar based on your emails. Due to a large number of registrations, unfortunately we cannot ensure that every student who registered may eventually take this seminar, neither we can ensure that a student will be assigned a paper based on his/her top-3 choices of paper list.

 

First Presentation:

On Saturday, March 21, we will have the first session of our seminar.  There will be eight talks (each about 30 minutes).  The coordinates are: 

  Location:  CAB H52
  Starting Time:  8:15 am (sharp)

Since the building will be locked, we shall meet at 8:00 am at the back entrance of the CAB building.  (The back entrance is the entrance facing the Sternwarte, the ASV entrance, and just at the other side of the main entrance.)  Please, be on time so that we can start on time.

 

Second Presentation:

Saturday, April 25, the second session of our seminar takes place.

Location: BIN 2.A.01 (ifi, Binzmühlestrasse 14, Oerlikon)
Starting Time: 8:15

The building is locked and we meet at 8:05am at the front entrance
(roughly in the middle between tram stops Bahnhof Oerlikon Ost and Leutschenbach) 

 

Final Report:

The final version of the report is due at the end of the semester. The final report must be self-contained, about 10 pages (single-column is fine). Please email your final report to all three professors.

 

Schedule:

Paper Date Professor/ Post-doc Presenter Buddy
(1) Mining Frequent Graph Pattern with Differential Privacy March 21   Arijit Khan Linus Handschin Diana Birenbaum

 

(2) Mining Top-k High Utility Itemsets March 21

Michael Böhlen

Daniel Yu Sofia Orlova
(3) Mining Uncertain Data with Probabilistic Guarantees March 21 Michael Böhlen  Anna Durrer Andreas Enz
(4) Collective Graph Identification March 21 Peter Widmayer  Floran Gmehlin Marco Alvaro
(5) Efficient Episode Mining of Dynamic Event Streams March 21 Arijit Khan Marco Alvaro Veronika Molnar 
(6) An Information Theoretic Framework for Data Mining March 21 Arijit Khan Lukas Striebel Lilian Boesch 
(7) Tell Me What I Need to Know: Succinctly Summarizing Data with Itemsets March 21 Peter Widmayer  Sivaranjini Chithambaram Imanol Studer 
(8) Summarization-based Mining Bipartite Graphs March 21

Michael Böhlen 

Annika Glauser Yuves Bieri 
(9) Selecting a Comprehensive Set of Reviews March 21 Peter Widmayer  Cyrill Gossi  Marcel Molnar 
(10) Clustering Time Series using Unsupervised-Shapelets April 25 Arijit Khan Lilian Boesch Anna Durrer 
(11) Comparing Apples to Oranges: A Scalable Solution with Heterogeneous Hashing April 25

Michael Böhlen

   
(12) Social Sampling April 25  Peter Widmayer Marcel Mohler Annika Glauser 
(13) Selective Sampling on Graphs for Classification April 25 Arijit Khan Diana Birenbaum Daniel Yu 
(14) Reconstructing Graphs from Neighborhood Data April 25 Peter Widmayer  Yuves Bieri Sivaranjini Chithambaram 
(15) Analyzing massive astrophysical datasets: Can Pig/Hadoop or a relational DBMS help? April 25 Arijit Khan     
(16) Which Space Partitioning Tree to Use for Search? April 25

Michael Böhlen

Sofia Orlova Linus Handschin 
(17) Density estimation trees April 25

Michael Böhlen

Imanol Studer Cyrill Gossi 
(18) A Parallel Hashed Oct-Tree N-Body Algorithm April 25  Peter Widmayer Andreas Enz Floran Gmehlin 

 

Language

All reports must be written in English. All talks must be in English.

 

 

 

Case Studies from Practice

Exam: 

  • Final exam: 3 June in HG D1.1 at 10:00 am (90 minutes).
  • Mid-term 16 March (45 minutes)

Course description

The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of “real-life” challenges taken from corporate settings and teach them how to address these.
 

Objective

By using case studies that are based on actual IT projects, students will learn how to deal with complex, not-straightforward problems. It will help them to apply their theoretical Computer Science background to real life situations and will teach them fundamental principles of IT management and challenges with IT in practice.
 

Content

The course "Case Studies from Practice" bridges the gap between computer science at ETH and the industry. In interactive case studies company representatives present the diversity of challenges in the daily routine and work of computer science graduates from ETH. As an integral part of the course, non-technical skills such as business problem-solving, communication and presentation, interviewing and relationship management are discussed and trained.

The course is particularly suitable for students who want to gain an overview of the different working areas and want to prepare for entrance into professional life.

Presenting companies so far include Deloitte (how to develop innovative technology solutions for a luxury retailer), Selfnation (lessons learned from a startup company), Credit Suisse (investment banking case), HP (business continuity management), 28msec (product pricing in a software startup company), Open Web Technology (strategic choices in software development), and Marc Brandis Strategic Consulting (various).

Course Hours

Lectures

  • Mon, 12:00-14:00 HG E 21

Exercise

  • Mon,  14:00-15:00 HG E 21


Lecturer

Marc Brandis

Software Defined Networking: The Data Centre Persepective

News

Apr 23: Change in schedule has taken place. The calss on May 8 will not take place. Topics T8 and T9 will be discussed on May 22 and T10 and T11 on May 29. 

Moderation guidelines available here.

Interesting papers, blogs, etc. available here.

 

Description

The students covers one of the most promising new developments in data centre connectivity - Software Defined Networking. In the seminar we will critically review and discuss literature on SDN basics, challenges and promissing new trend as well as look at practical examples from SDN's use by industry.  

The students get familiar with adoption and implementation of SDN strategies for intra- and inter-data centre connectivity and lead discussion on specific trends within SDN that will shape its future development. By partisipating in the seminar the students learn how to critically read, analyse and summarize a scientific writing. Through the interactive seminar form they also practice preparing and giving presentations as well as moderation skills. 

  

Lecturer

 

Schedule

Dates

Time

Topic

Room

20/2/2015

1-3pm

Introduction

CAB G 56 

27/2/2015

1-3pm

T1: Pre-SDN era: network trends in data centre networking 
T1_presentation.pdf
T1_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2

6/3/2015

1-3pm

T2: SDN basics and the Open Flow protocol
T2_presentation.pdf
T2_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2

13/3/2015

1-3pm

T3: SDN scalability and implementation challenges
T3_presentation Link
T3_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2

20/3/2015

1-3pm

T4: Routing strategies in SDN
T4_presentation.pdf
T4_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2    

27/3/2015

1-3pm

T5: Protocol Oblivious Forwarding
T5_presentation.pdf
T5_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2 

17/4/2015

1-3pm

T6: SDN in practice: Microsoft's Swan
T6_presentation.pdf
T6_discusion.pdf

CAB F74.2

24/4/2015

1-3pm

T9: SDN and Flow Management: DevoFlow
T9_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2

8/5/2015

1-3pm

no class

CAB F74.2

22/5/2015

1-3pm

T7: SDN in practice: Google's B4
T7_presentation.pdf
T7_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2

22/5/2015

1-3pm

T8: SDN in practice: CISCO's Application Policy Infrastructure
T8_presentation.pdf
T8_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2 

29/5/2015

1-3pm

T10: Network Function Virtualization
T10_presentation.pdf
T10_discussion.pdf

T11: SDN solutions for data centers in mobile networks
T11_presentation.pdf
T11_discussion.pdf

CAB F74.2 

The papers related to each topic are listed below.  

 

Form

The seminar is organisedas interactive discussion that allows the student to develop their presentation, moderation and discussion skills. Each student presents a topic and the rest divide into two camps that defend and critisize the topics.  

Review 

Each student has a topic to present. He/she reviews critically the paper(s) of the topic in order to present it in class. The students not presenting on the topic are organized into camps and review the paper with the objective to find supporting or counter-supporting arguments on the topic. Each student then prepares 3 points according to his/her camp and submits them by Friday 9am before the class. Submissions are done via sdn_seminar@lists.inf.ethz.ch.

While reading and reviewing the papers, the students develop and train skills in critical thinking and analytical reasoning. Presenters should focus on structure and identification of key aspects, while the rest focuses on the strong and week points of the paper/topic. Keeping notes while reading helps. Interesting tutorials to consult are "How to review" and "How NOT to review" a paper before you start.

Presentation

Each student gives a presentation on its selected topic. The presentations should be 20 min so careful evaluations on what to include in the slides should be done. The lecturers can help in that if requested. In the preparation taking graphs and figures from the papers is allowed when properly referenced. Whiteboard use is also encouraged. The presentation style is up to the student but we encourage you to take the opportunity to improve your presentation skills. These two guidelines can help in the preparation - "Dazzle 'em with style" and David Attenborough's guide.

Some interesting guidelines towards good moderation: "How to moderate a pannel", "Tips for facilitating a group discussion", "Moderating a Discussion" and "Effective Roundtable Facilitating Techniques" (RoundtableFacilitatingTechniques.pdf). 

The presentation should not cover the paper(s) in detail but rather focus on the positioning, motivation and key contributions of the main theme. While preparing the presentation, the students can assume that the seminar participants know nothing about the paper, but are comfortable with the networking area. Rehearse the presentation to ensure staying within the time limit.

Discussion

All students are expected to participate in the discussion. We will have two camps - in support of the topic and critisizing the topic. The presenter should include a final slide with open questios on the topic to help the discussion. The rest of the students prepare at least 3 points each that defend or chritisize the topic, depending on his/her camp. The points will be used in the paper discussion and submitted in written form evaluation. 

 

Allocation

Name Topic Defend Critisize
 Birkner, Rüdiger  T5 T1-T4,T6  T7-T11 
 Chang, Michael   T3  T1-T2,T4-T6  T7-T11
 Chothia, Zaheer  T1  T1-T5  T6-T7,T9-T11
van Gelder, Jasper  T8  T1-T5  T6-T9,T10-T11
 Lee, Tae-Ho  T11  T1-T5  T6-T10
 Miladinovic, Djordje  T6  T7-T11  T1-T5
 Pappas, Christos  T10  T6-T9,T11  T1-T5
 Schmid, Stefan  T2  T7-T11  T1,T3-T6
 Schinde, Pravid  T7  T6,T8-T11  T1-T5
 Yu, Xinyuan  T4  T7-T11  T1-T3,T5-T6

 

Topics

For each topic there are 1-2 papers to be reviewed. Papers on the same topic are selected such that they offer thematic overlap so their review is easily done together. Free reading suggestions indicate useful papers on the topic which the students can read on their own if interested. Free reading is not part of the seminar work.

  • T1: Pre-SDN era: network trends in data centre networking
    • Communication within Clouds: Open Standards and Proprietary Protocols for Data Center Networking Link
    • Data Center Overlay Technologies, Cisco White Paper Link
    • Free Reading: Enabling Technologies for Future Data Center Networking: A Primer Link
  • T2: SDN basics and the Open Flow protocol
    • A Survey of Software-Defined Networking: Past, Present, and Future of Programmable Networks Link
    • Free Reading: Network Innovation using OpenFlow: A Survey Link
  • T3: SDN scalability and implementation challenges
    • On Scalability of Software-Defined Networking  Link
    • Are We Ready for SDN? Implementation Challenges for Software-Defined Networks Link
  • T4: Routing strategies in SDN
    • Demistifying Routing Services In Software Defined Networking Link
    • Revisiting Routing Control Platforms with the Eyes and Muscles of Software-Defined Networking Link 
  • T5: Protocol Oblivious Forwarding
    • Protocol-Oblivious Forwarding: Unleash the Power of SDN through a Future-Proof Forwarding Plane Link
    • Forwarding Programming in Protocol-Oblivious Instruction Set Link
  • T6: SDN in practice: Microsoft's SWAN
    • Achieving High Utilization with Software-Driven WAN Link
  • T7: SDN in practice: Google's B4
    • B4: Experience with a Globally-Deployed Software Defined WAN Link
  • T8: SDN in practice: CISCO's Application Policy Infrastructure
    • Application Centric Infrastructure Overview Link
    • The Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller Link
  • T9: SDN and Flow Management: DevoFlow
  • T10: Network Function Virtualization
    • Research Directions in Network Service Chaining Link 
  • T11: SDN solutions for data centers in mobile networks
    • Toward Software-Defined Cellular Networks Link
    • Moving the mobile Evolved Packet Core to the cloud Link

 

Interesting reading

Talks

  • The Road to SDN talk  
  • Scott Schenker: Keynote at the 1st Open Networking Summit in 2011 talk
  • Data Centre Networks lecture slides
  • Ericsson: The Evolution of Programmable Networks: From Active Networks to Software Defined Networks (SDN) slides

Blogs

  • Discussion article on Scott Schenker's talk Link
  • SDN's Eventually Consistent Network Problem Link

Articles


 

Courses Spring 2016

SPRING SEMESTER 2016                                                    * Fall 2015

Advanced Computer Networks

Patrick Stüdi - 5 credits, 2V+2U
Course webpage -
ETH Course catalogue entry


Case Studies from Practice

Marc Brandis - 4 credits, 2V+1U
Course webpage -
ETH Course catalogue entry


Data Modelling and Databases

Gustavo Alonso - 7 credits, 4V+2U
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry


Internet Architecture & Policy 

S. Bechtold, T. Roscoe - 6 credits, 2V+2U
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry


Software Defined Networking: The Data Centre Perspective

Timothy Roscoe, Desislava Dimitrova - 2 hrs. Seminar
Course webpage - ETH Course catalogue entry